Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Long Time No Post

Gentle Friends, when I last posted I mentioned I was going to share some family pieces of needlework I have...  and although I had every intention of posting right away - it seems that one thing or another just kept me from it... forgetting my camera , then may battery was all wonky, I have just every excuse out there, but never mind, today I have the snaps, and now I am going to share.....



This large piece is one from a set of three motto's, from kits, my mom stitched in the late 70's.  She really enjoyed working on printed linen.  I find that type of stitching a bit on the messy side, and prefer the even stitches of counted cross stitch.  I think it was the primitive, or more homespun look that my mom liked about this stitching.


This is another piece my mom did, she got this kit in Old Sturbridge Village when we were the on a family vacation.  I remember this vacation so well, and so not only do I have those vacation memories but this super piece.  I also remember when my mom had it framed...  the framer couldn't make the church "not" look wonky and keep the lettering straight, so they opted to keep the church straight.

My little vignette here includes a small piece of needlepoint my mom did, in the 70's.  She preferred to do needlepoint when we went on vacation, and I remember ongoing WIP's that only got attention during the summer when in the car going somewhere - we three kids squawking in the back and mom and dad in the front - dad driving and mom stitching away on something. 


Same vignette, different piece...  this piece was stitched by my maternal grand mother in the 1930's.  I don't know much else about it - I really like the soft faded colours that it has taken on over the years.


This quilt was made by maternal great grandmother in about 1897 or so - it has yellowed and is not in the best condition - with lots of fraying.  The Wahumpa hound jumped up and off in the flick of this picture - I think he was just checking out something "new"....Here's a close up of some quilting that my grand mother at the age on 10 or so did on this piece..

 It's a little man with a cane - all the other baskets have just three plain leaves in this spot, except this one.  I wonder how I would clean this quilt or have it preserved????  any suggestions from the Blog World???


  This footstool/slipper box has a piece of needlepoint on the lid that my great Aunt Mary did for my great grandfather - he kept his slippers inside.  It has seen better days, and at some point I will take it off so that it doesn't deteriorate any more and stitch something else for the top.
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That's a tour of some of my family's needlework.  For my part I am slowly stitching away on Elizabeth Shepard - I'll have a snaperoo tomorrow of the  progress.

Don't forget about the "St Patrick's Drawing" - you have until Friday afternoon to sign up.

That's about it for today sports fans!!  Thanks for stopping by, do stop again!!

Take care,
edgar



28 comments:

Vicki said...

What beautiful family heirlooms for you to display and enjoy. The quilt is beyond words! You might try to find a local quilting society (I know they are few and far between these days!) to see if they have a recommendation for restoration/preservation. Or you might call a museum to see if they have a resource for you. It's a gorgeous piece! Thank you for sharing.

ariadne said...

Great beautiful pieces!It is so nice that they are being appreciated!AriadnefromGreece!

diamondc said...

Dearest Edgar: How lucky you are to have such beautiful memories from your Mother, I love them all.
The church is my favorite.
I would suggest you contact the Local Needlework Guild, they should have a list of someone who can help you preserve this lovely quilt ( I am so envious) if you go to an antique shop they may know of someone also.
Good luck on your hunt for help.

Love the picts of your hoo hounds.
Hugs
Happy St. Patty's Day
I will drink green beer.
Catherine

CalamityJr said...

What wonderful heirlooms! You are blessed to have such lovely visual memories.

Synthia said...

Your treasures are beautiful. Being a quilter myself, I'm especially enthralled with the quilt. A quilt that old and in that condition should only be washed by hand in a very mild soap (Orvis is best) and dried flat (on a sheet) . The quilt should be soaked in the soap in a bathtub and gently squished and squished by hand; then rinsed several times to remove all soap. Laying the quilt outside on a sheet, in the shade in the summer to dry is ideal but may not be possible. Go to your local quilt store for more detailed information. Your quilt is so precious it deserves the best attention.

Katherine said...

Edgar - GORGEOUS quilt. I would say DON'T clean it. If it really needs to be cleaned, then you'll have to, but it does look in rough shape and washing it may do more harm than good. I can check some of my books and comment again later. Unless of course, someone who knows lots more about it than me comments in the meantime. I love that you have all those pieces, not just from your mom, but grandma too! I have some going back 3 generations. Oh, don't forget to store that quilt in either an archival box with archival tissue OR in a cotton pillowcase.

Lori said...

What lovely pieces and how fortunate you are to have them. I have treasured pieces from my mother, grandmothers, great & great-great aunts. I like to think that I am carrying on a family heritage of needlework. Lovely post!

Katherine said...

Edgar - I'm back; thought I'd check a website I had in the back of my mind and I was right, they have a great page on caring for your quilt. Go to the International Quilt Study Center page at:

www.quiltstudy.org/about_us/questions_answers/care.html

Hope it helps you out.

riona said...

What a treasure trove you have in those pieces. You might try contacting your local historical society for tips on preserving the quilt or e-mailing the American Quilt Museum in Paducah, Ky. to see if they have any suggestions. I love the footstool/slipper box as well ... I'd look into seeing about preserving that intact as well if I were you. I'd avoid removing the original stitching if it were at all possible to preserve it "in situ".

Tracey said...

What wonderful treasures, Edgar! Thanks so much for sharing ☺

MoonBeam said...

I had just started scrolling down your post when my eyes almost popped out. I have that exact Give Us This Day piece hanging in my kitchen, brought from my mother's house. I knew it was a preprinted stitch piece but I was uncertain as to whether my mother or my grandmother ( the more prolific needle woman) had stitched it. Based on what you said about the time frame, I now think that my mother stitched this, but I guess I will always have a little doubt about that.

What a wonderful collection of beautiful and special things you have there.

Bobbi

pj said...

Edgar, Such beautiful treasures! I know you will look at these items often with great memories. I hope you can preserve the quilt as it is gorgeous! And I loved the little footstool...I am sure you will find another topper for it but needlepoint holds up better than cross stitch if you plan to use it and store your slippers!!! :) Pam in Iowa

Mary said...

Edgar, you are so lucky to have those wonderful treasures. I love them all, but the little oval needlepoint with the dark background is extra sweet! My aunt has the same (or very similar) footstool. She did a crewel piece for the top in the 70's. I took a pic of it on my trip to Charleston that I'll have to post.

Julie said...

You've got great family heirlooms there Edgar, the sipper box is fantastic. Your family were very talented, you've obviously inherited their talents with your craftwork.

Margaret said...

It's so wonderful to have a history of your family in needlework! Beautiful pieces too. I love seeing everything.

Laurie in Iowa said...

All the stitched pieces and quilt are lovely. Wonderful remembrances for you to cherish.

Kielrain said...

What wonderful pieces. I just love that quilt.

Beth said...

What beautiful things Edgar. As for the quilt, I don't have any antique quilts, but there are a lot of quilt bloggers out there who probably know how to clean them. Maybe do a search for that and see what you come up with. I read a lot of quilt blogs since I quilt, and I know I have seen people talk about it.

cucki said...

Wow such lovely treasures..I love them so much
Big hugs x

Sew Sew Special said...

Oh WOW...I have the same Old Meeting House embroidery my mom did...this brought back some great memories..I MUST go through my hope chest and pull it out!

Catherine said...

What a fabulous tour, Edgar! Thanks for sharing.

Vicky said...

I would make contact with a textile museum and see if they can help with your quilt :)

Denise said...

I really enjoyed seeing your family pieces of needlework - such treasures!
I recently received 3 quilts made by grandmother and I have a few things
that my mother has stitched - all very special.
I especially like the footstool and I like your idea of removing and saving that piece and replacing it with a newer one of your own. Should we
be expecting to see that in the near future??!!

Deborah said...

What beautiful stitching your family has done. Wonderful memories. I just love the slipper box.

Barb said...

You are fortunate to have so much wonderful family needlework! They are also lucky that you value their work. I just hate to see old needlework in thrift shops.

Rita said...

Thanks for sharing pics of your beautiful family heirlooms.

Jeanne said...

I loved seeing all your treasures Edgar and so nice you are preserving your family's history of needlework. I worry about what's going to happen to all my stuff as there is no future generation in my family. I guess someone will get some good deals at the thrift store someday!

Akila said...

I enjoyed seeing all your treasures, that's what we should call them. They look so classy and in such good condition. I hope I am able to leave somethings back for my daughter too, to look back :)